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2016

17-19 June Bali, Indonesia

2014

Hyderabad Conference Brisbane Institute

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2012

Kathmandu Conference Nepal

2011

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Bosnia and Herzegovina

2010

Brisbane Institute of Strengths Based Practice Australia

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Queensland, Australia

2009

Coping Resilience International Conference Dubrovnik Brisbane Institute

Dubrovnik Conference Croatia

2006

Hyderabad Conference Brisbane Institute

Hyderabad Conference India

 

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Professor Lesley Chenoweth

A Charles Sturt University Initiative

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Professor Lesley Chenoweth

Responding to the Challenges of Contemporary and Future Human Services - Beyond Survival to Proactive Change

The Role and Direction of Social Work and Human Services in the current Economic environment

Cooking for Social Work

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Working With Challenging Clients: Motivation, Cooperation And Assisting Behaviour Change

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Coping Resilience & Hope Building, Asia Pacific Regional Conference,

Brisbane 9-11 July 2010

EXPLORING FAMILY RESILIENCE IN FAMILIES LIVING WITH ADDICTION
Dr. Bee Teng Lim, Helen Moriarty, Maria Stubbe, Sarah Bradford & Sophie Tapper


Dr. Bee Teng Lim, Helen Moriarty, Maria Stubbe, Sarah Bradford & Sophie TapperImpacts of addiction are complex and pervasive on affected families. How do families cope, living with a family member with a drug, alcohol or behaviour addictions? What characterises a resilient family? How can helping and counselling services contribute to enhance family resilience? An exploratory study, was conducted to address these questions, the findings of which suggest that addictions, regardless of the underlying problem being alcohol-, drug-, or behaviour-related, lead to widespread and ongoing problems for non-addicted family members. Common barriers were societal stigma and lack of access to helping services that deterred the affected family members as well as the addicted family member. Four common coping strategies used by non-addicted family members were minimizing, making allowances, turning away and carrying on, all appear to short term solutions to adversity but did not imply or foster family resilience, were identified. The need for increasing the understanding of resilience among the families and the role of helping and counselling services as collaborators in identifying family strengths and resources are discussed.
Biodata: Dr Bee Tee Lim is a post-doctoral fellow at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Bee is currently researching in the field of positive psychology and related areas of human strengths as opposed to deficits. Bee.Lim@vuw.ac.nz
PSYCHIATRIC PROFILING OF THE INDIAN GERIATRIC POPULATION: IMPLICATION FOR POSSIBLE INTERVENTIONS - Dr. Braj Bhushan

Dr. Braj BhushanThe primary objective of this study was to explore the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among the elderly in India and to find the mediating and moderating role of different coping strategies in dealing with them. 390 subjects with an age ranging from 50-90 years (M = 64.85, SD = 9.63) participated in this study. Results indicated that the main effect of resilience and religiosity was significant, but the interaction effect did not turn out to be significant. Resilient elderly people used proactive coping technique in order to achieve anticipatory preparedness. By using preventive and strategic coping techniques t heywere able to handle anxiety, depression, psychoticism, fear of aging, somatization, paranoia and cognitive competence whereas those using reflective coping technique were able to handle depression, psychoticism and fear of aging only. The findings have implication for intervention programme. Of all the factors, resilience and proactive coping strategy seems more important variables for mitigating the psychiatric/ psychological issues. Resilience and proactive coping may be construed amenable to training, and hence have significance for intervention. Besides, religiosity seemed to enhance the effect of resilience in dealing with the mental health issues.
Biodata: Braj Bhushan is Asst. Prof of Psychology at the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur. Braj has 5 chapters in books & 25 articles, and held a Visiting Professorship at Kyushu University, Japan. His books are: Bhushan, Communication in Perspective. 2010, Amani International, Kiel-Germany, and Statistics for Social Sciences.,2007,Prentice-Hall, brajb@iitk.ac.in
SOME EVIDENCE-BASED STRATEGIES TO BUILD ON CULTURAL STRENGTHS FOR BETTER MENTAL WELLBEING - Elvia Ramirez and Farah Suleman

Elvia Ramirez and Farah SulemanThe strengths of people arriving in Australia with and without a refugee background have been underestimated. This paper will focus on the strategies that selected cultural groups use prior and following migration as identified by a study and the implementation of community engagement and education activities. In addition, it will focus on the key components of three versions of a group program designed to build resilience in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) children, adolescents and adults to learn to cope with acculturation stress. The findings of different programs implemented by the Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention Program of the Qld Transcultural Mental Health Centre will also demonstrate how existing CALD community strengths have been enhanced by evidence-based programs. Examples of programs are: the Building Resilience in Transcultural Australians (BRiTA Futures), the Depression and Chronic Disease Self-Management and the Multicultural Mental Health Literacy programs that use bilingual and bicultural community mental health promoters for effective community engagement and program implementation.
Biodata: Elvia Ramirez coordinates the Mental Health Promotion, Prevention and Early Intervention program at the Qld Transcultural Mental Health Centre, and is also involved in the BRiTA Futures, Stigma Reduction and the Building on Cultural Strengths mental health literacy programs. Elvia_Ramirez@health.qld.gov.au
Biodata: Farah Suleman has been with BRiTA Futures since 2008. Farah coordinates training, provides support to trained Group Facilitators and delivers the program in schools and community settings and deals with the marketing of BRiTA Futures. Farah_Suleman@health.qld.gov.au
GRIEF & LOSS COUNSELLING WITH PERSONS WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY - Judith Pagan

Judith Pagan, GRIEF & LOSS COUNSELLINGPeople with an intellectual disability have been disenfranchised of grief and bereavement due to perceptions that they do not have the capacity to grieve, understand the concept of death and form attachments in relationships with family, friends and the wider community. Research has dispelled these myths and there is increasing professional and social recognition of the value of supporting people through the normal expressions of grief, participation in bereavement rituals and cultural customs, and providing therapeutic intervention following indications of complex grief impacting on the person's behaviour and psychological and spiritual well-being.
Biodata: Judith Pagan works in the area of Program Management in SE Qld Region, Disability Services, Department of Communities This is her 19th year of working in the public sector providing specialist disability services. Judith has physical disability from Cerebral Palsy, enjoys horse-riding & travelling and is currently completing the Master of Social Work at University of Queensland. jpagan@communities.qld.gov.au
A MODEL FOR INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION FOR HUMAN SERVICE PROFESSIONALS - Maria Julia-Billups

Maria Julia-Billups An interprofessional approach to practice in the human service professions is needed in order to effectively intervene with the challenges that social problems present to us. Human resilience promotion and hope building are better understood and applied from an interdisciplinary perspective.
This paper reports a unique approach and set of experiences in the development and implementation of a multidimensional model for the understanding, practicing, and evaluating interprofessional practice and education. The aim is to examine problems precipitating the need for interprofessional education; discuss limited interprofessioanal education arrangements; methodology of an alternative model; underlying assumptions, implications, limitations, and strengths of the proposed model. Conceptual framework, contents, references, and other educational resources and techniques are presented and analyzed. Underlying values about the significance of a human-in-the-environment ecological approach serve as the foundation for the model presented.
Biodata: Maria Julia-Billups, Professor, Ohio State University has over 100 scholarly publications, including 3 books; more than 100 worldwide presentations. Actively involved in the academic, national, and international community, providing services in multiple organizations, boards, commissions and consortium. Julia.1@osu.edu
SILENT, SILENCED AND POWERLESS - RESILIENCE AND AGENCY IN RURAL GAY MEN - Dr Ed Green

Dr Ed Green This paper presents “empowering alternatives” in a cohort of marginalized individuals who are usually considered to be silent, silenced and powerless: The gay men who have chosen to stay and live their lives in rural areas. It cites a largely unreported aptitude and adeptness by men to live contented lives in areas well away from urban cosmopolitan milieu. It argues that their resilience allows them to deploy a multiplicity of actions and reflective processes that, despite their apparent subordinate position in the rural communities, continues to give them, determination to live their lives as and where they choose.
But these men's personal strengths can also be seen through other conceptual frameworks. The notions of 'agency' and 'resistance', when applied to these gay men, also shed light on their empowerment in the face of omni-present difficulties. It is the realisation of their own capacity for action to improve their lives and to live them as they wish for agency that is their springboard to resistance. This paper demonstrates that seemingly subordinate individuals can express counteractions to the hegemonic ideology, in this case represented by the 'countrymindedness' which underlay the structure of social domination in rural communities.
Biodata: Ed is Dean at the Australian College of Applied Psychology. In 2008, Ed took the Post-Doctoral Fellowship under the Australian Government's Endeavour Program. at Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) in Yogakarta (Indonesia) where he researched the lived experience rural men who have sex with men and the implications of their lived experience for local HIV education programs. ed.green@acap.edu.au
WANTING TO HOPE: NEGOTIATING LOSS WHEN SOMEONE IS MISSING - Julie Clark

Julie ClarkFamily members of long-term missing people struggle to cope with the consequences of “missingness”, sometimes for decades. Many demonstrate resilience in difficult circumstances despite finding little support accessible to them, as too little is understood about the issues they face. The voices of people affected by 'missingness' are beginning to be heard and their stories of resilience to be told. From qualitative research with siblings of long term missing people, a trajectory of loss is proposed that explains common themes in efforts to negotiate loss. Notions of ambiguous loss and disenfranchised grief for people 'left behind' are discussed.
This paper discusses issues for people affected when someone goes missing and positions “missingness” as an issue that overlaps with many fields of practice, none more clearly than mental health. It challenges workers to recognise 'going missing' as a consequence of a complex set of interconnected issues including coping difficulties and to consider the risk of someone going missing in their assessment of people who may be vulnerable. It suggests the needs of family and friends, and missing people will be better met when existing services recognise the issues and shape service responses within existing services.
Biodata: Dr Julie Clark completed her PhD on the Experience of siblings of long-term missing people in 2006. She is an experienced social worker and has worked in a range of roles with children and families. She has research interests in missing people, supervision, ethics and child protection. j.clark@griffith.edu.au
EMPOWERING INDIVIDUAL INHERENT COPING AND RESILIENCE WITH NEUROTECHNOLOGY: AN EXPERIENTIAL WORKSHOP - Jonathan Robert Banks

Jonathan Robert Banks, EMPOWERING INDIVIDUAL INHERENTResearch demonstrates that meditation, deep relaxation, mindfulness, self hypnosis etc, increase a person's coping ability, resilience and hope building, physiological healing and health. People appear to access: innate wisdom, strength, confidence, hope and reasonableness, and they begin doing things in their life that are so much more healthy and constructive without being directly coached to do so. New fields of applied behavioural neuroscience, psychophysiology and neurotechnologies such as brainwave biofeedback and brainwave entrainment are enabling people to gain the benefits of meditation with these safe, natural and easy to use tools without having to learn a technique.
When used repeatedly an accumulative effect is created that access people to their innate and natural inner strengths. There is an immediate benefit at the acute stage as well as long term benefits for ongoing recovery. These tools generate the greatest leverage to individual's inner strengths, which substantially enhances family and community recovery and hope building directly and indirectly by improving the impact of all behavioural/external interventions directed at individuals and groups at every stage. An opportunity in this workshop to sit down and see if you can fly through a virtual tunnel, race a car, make a flower blossom with just your brainwaves.
Biodata: Jonathan Robert Banks has developed leading edge personal development programs, CDs and a neurotechnology device, utilising state of the art technology for stress management/rehabilitation and peak performance. He has been Consultant for the Royal Adelaide Hospital in South Australia, BHP, SANTOS, Telstra, Australian National, and DSTO amongst others. He has worked with sporting teams and athletes including 1997 World Gold Medal Title holders. jonathan@neurotechcoaching.com.au
DEVELOPING COMMUNITY NETWORKS AND PARTNERSHIPS IN PROMOTING POSITIVE MENTAL HEALTH IN RURAL SOUTH AUSTRALIA - Abraham Francis

Abraham Francis This paper is based on field practice. It presents community work experiences and reflections about how rural communities can be engaged in the process of addressing issues of mental health and specially in challenging the myths of stigma attached to mental health. The paper describes the methods used in developing community net works and partnerships in rural South Australia and analyses how these methods have supported in creating positive environment in the local communities to promote mental health. It also outlines some of the challenges and issues faced in the field.
The paper examines the strengths of rural communities by exploring the nature of existing safety net groups, and analyses the partnerships and net works that were formed during the tenure of author's employment. This is highlighted with case examples to illustrate how strength based partnership models enhance creating supportive environment in communities, under the initiative of developing Mental Health Support Groups and Mental Health Action Groups in rural South Australia. Additionally the paper examines the strengths of the evolving role of communities in promoting mental health and suggests intervention strategies and raises questions for further research in social work practice with communities.
Boidata: Abraham Francis is a social activist and an academic employed with the James Cook University. Prior to migrating to Australia he worked as a social worker and as a Lecturer in India. This paper relates to his work in South Australia.
abraham.francis@jcu.edu.au
CREATING RESILIENCE IN THE COMMUNITIES FOR CHILDREN POLICY - Antonia Hendrick, Susan Young

Antonia Hendrick, Susan YoungFederal government policy strategies to address childhood and family disadvantage have encouraged self-reliance and self-responsibility over the past few years with a focus on making family and child friendly communities sustainable. There is the expectation that even the most disadvantaged families and communities will be able to overcome the circumstances of structural disadvantage, poverty and other deficits such as poor health and become fully functioning citizens. Such initiatives presuppose that there exist strengths and resilience within communities and families without necessarily enacting practices within the strategies to enhance people's capacities. Action Research (AR) was an original component of the Communities for Children (C4C) Initiative and was designed to address childhood disadvantage with a focus on developing capacities in families and communities in select rural and urban regions across Australia. Although AR was not continued as a policy priority, we argue that its processes and practices can contribute to long term effectiveness, with sustainable outcomes, towards greater social justice, inclusion and overall greater standards of living for disadvantaged communities. Examples of Western Australian C4C sites, demonstrate this potential and offer suggestions for future policy direction.
Biodata: Antonia Hendrick is a Social Work Lecturer for Curtin University of Technology and is also currently in the final stages of her PhD. Antonia's interest lies in the area of community development and social policy. a.hendrick@curtin.edu.au

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